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History of the U.S. Department Of Energy

The energy crisis of the 1970s demonstrated the need for unified energy planning within the federal government. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Organization Act (Public Law 95-91), centralizing the responsibilities of the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Power Commission and other energy-related government programs into a single presidential cabinet-level department. The DOE, activated on Oct. 1, 1977, provided the framework for a comprehensive national energy plan by coordinating federal energy functions. The new Department was responsible for long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, federal power marketing, energy conservation, energy regulatory programs, a central energy data collection and analysis program, and nuclear weapons research, development and production.

When the Cold War ended in the early 1990s, the primary missions of many former nuclear weapons production sites changed to environmental remediation. In 1989, Energy Secretary James Watkins created the new Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (later renamed the DOE Office of Environmental Management) to mitigate risks and hazards posed by legacy nuclear weapons production.

In 1994, DOE formed the DOE Ohio Field Office, the first multi-site field office in 30 years, to oversee five project offices responsible for environmental remediation, waste management, technology development and nuclear material/facility stabilization. Four of the five DOE offices are located in Ohio: the Fernald Closure Project, the Ashtabula Closure Project, the Columbus Closure Project and the Mound Closure Project. The West Valley Demonstration Project Office is located in New York.

The DOE-Fernald Closure Project Office is responsible for the cleanup and final restoration of the 1,050-acre Fernald site and is structured to support the major cleanup projects. For more information about the DOE-Fernald Closure Project, contact Sue Walpole, 513-648-4026, email: Sue.Walpole@lm.doe.gov.

 

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Together, DOE and Fluor Fernald were committed to safely restoring the 
Fernald site to an end state that serves the needs of the community.