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Building 371
Building History
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CO-83-K-1 – Aerial view looking south-southeast at Building 371 under construction. The building is a multilevel structure, partially underground. The plutonium storage vault extends from the west side of the building. Footings for Building 374 are visible to the left of Building 371. (5/2/74)
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CO-83-K-2 – Aerial view looking north-northeast at the subbasement of Building 371 under construction. The subbasement, the bottom level, is an irregularly shaped area consisting primarily of the lower portion of the plutonium storage vault and its transfer, repair, and stacker-retriever maintenance bays. The plutonium storage vault runs east-west. (7/2/74)
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CO-83-K-3 – Aerial view looking south at Building 371 basement under construction. The basement houses heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment and mechanical utilities, the upper part of the plutonium storage vault and maintenance bay, and small plutonium processing areas. The basement level is divided into nearly equal north and south parts by the upper portion of the plutonium storage vault. (10/7/74)
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CO-83-K-4 – Aerial view looking south-southwest at Building 371 ground floor under construction. The ground floor, which contains the majority of the plutonium recovery processing equipment, is divided into compartments by firewalls, airlocks, and use of negative air pressure. (1/7/75)
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CO-83-K-5 – Aerial view looking north at Building 371 after construction was completed. (11/7/78)
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CO-83-K-6 – View of Building 371 exterior wall construction detail. Building construction was hardened to withstand the forces imposed by a design-basis earthquake or tornado. (7/1/74)
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CO-83-K-7 – View of airlock entry. Airlock double doors were used to keep atmospheres confined to specific areas. (6/29/78)
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CO-83-K-8 – View of residue storage door. (6/24/78)
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CO-83-K-9 – View of closed carrier lines for moving contaminated process filters and transporting solid and liquid material samples. (9/10/96)
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CO-83-K-10 – View of piping. The building had over 700 miles of piping, of which 70 miles were plutonium-processing lines. These processing lines ran through walls and traversed several floors. (6/29/78)
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CO-83-K-11 – View of the tanks for storage of plutonium-containing solutions. The tanks are in a vault. (1/80)
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CO-83-K-12 – View of remotely operated equipment. Operators viewed the equipment through a water-filled window. (10/8/81)
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CO-83-K-13 – Side view of the stacker-retriever crane from the transfer bay. The stacker-retriever is a remotely operated, mechanized transport system for retrieving plutonium containers from the storage vault. (1/80)
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CO-83-K-14 – End view of the plutonium storage vault from the remote control station. The stacker-retriever, a remotely operated, mechanized transport system, retrieves containers of plutonium from safe geometry pallets stored along the length of the vault. The stacker-retriever runs along the aisle between the pallets of the storage chamber. (3/2/86)
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CO-83-K-15 – View of the safe geometry plutonium metal storage pallets from the inside of an input-output station. Individual containers of plutonium are stored in the water-filled, double-walled, stainless steel tubes that are welded onto the pallets. (12/3/88)
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CO-83-K-16 – View of glove box workstations within the plutonium button breakout room. (9/82)
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CO-83-K-17 – View of the first plutonium button produced from the Building 371 aqueous recovery operation. (9/30/83)
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CO-83-K-18 – View of a canyon in the cleanup phase. Canyons were processing rooms used to house plutonium-handling operations that were not contained within glove boxes. Canyons were designed to become contaminated. (5/10/88)
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CO-83-K-19 – View of the interior of Building 374. Building 374, attached to Building 371, became operational in 1978 as the new radioactive waste treatment facility, replacing Building 774. (6/26/79)
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CO-83-K-20 – View of waste treatment control room in Building 374. The Building 371/374 complex was designed to emphasize automatically controlled, remotely operated processes. (1/80)
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