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Building 881
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CO-83-Q-1 – View looking south at Building 881 air stack during construction. (8/25/52)
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CO-83-Q-2 – View looking north at Building 881 during construction. (12/24/52)
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CO-83-Q-3 – View looking northwest at Building 881 during construction. (12/26/52)
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CO-83-Q-4 – View of the foundry. In the foundry, enriched uranium was cast into slabs or ingots from which weapons components were fabricated. (5/17/62)
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CO-83-Q-5 – View of the foundry. In the foundry, enriched uranium was cast into slabs or ingots from which weapons components were fabricated. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-6 – View of the briquetting press and chip-cleaning hood. Scraps of enriched uranium from machining operations were cleaned in a solvent bath, then pressed into briquetts. The briquetts were used as feed material for the foundry. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-7 – View of machine shop in Building 881. Workers in the machine shop formed enriched uranium components into their final shapes. (12/12/56)
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CO-83-Q-8 – View of the machine shop. By 1966, the machine shop handled primarily stainless steel components, which were sent to the machine shop to be formed into their final shapes. (7/24/70)
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CO-83-Q-9 – View of milling and lathe machines. Milling and lathe machines were used to form components into their final shape. In the foundry, enriched uranium was cast into spherical shapes or ingots from which weapons components were fabricated. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-10 – Detail view of a lathe. Lathes were used to form the final shape of the first trigger design. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-11 – Detail view of lathe equipment. Lathes were used to form the final shape of the first trigger design. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-12 – View of the nondestructive testing equipment used to detect flaws in fabricated components. (6/76)
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CO-83-Q-13 – View of a B-box, which was used in the fast-recovery process. Uranium oxide was transferred for dissolution in a room that housed three rows of B-boxes. B-boxes are controlled hoods, similar to lab hoods, that operated with high air velocities at their openings to ensure that the vapors were contained within the hood. (2/14/79)
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CO-83-Q-14 – View of the liquid chemical storage tanks. The floor is surfaced with stainless steel to contain spills and facilitate cleaning. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-15 – Detail view of enriched uranium storage tank. The glass rings shown at the top of the tank help prevent the uranium from reaching criticality limits. (4/12/62)
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CO-83-Q-16 – View of the enriched uranium recovery system. Enriched uranium recovery processed relatively pure materials and solutions and solid residues with relatively low uranium content. Uranium recovery involved both slow and fast processes. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-17 – View of hydriding system in Building 881. The hydriding system was part of the fast enriched uranium recovery process. (11/11/59)
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CO-83-Q-18 – View of the general chemistry lab. The laboratory provided general analytical and standards calibration as well as development operations, including waste technology development and development and testing of mechanical systems for weapons systems. (4/4/66)
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CO-83-Q-19 – View of the general chemistry laboratory in Building 881. (4/12/62)
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CO-83-Q-20 – View of the records storage area located on the first floor mezzanine. (1/83)
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CO-83-Q-21 – View of the entrance to the tunnel connecting Buildings 881 and 883. The tunnel was constructed in 1957 to transport enriched uranium components between the buildings. (1/98)
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  CO-83-Q-22 – View of the basement floor plan. The basement tunnels were designed as fallout shelters and used for storage. The original drawing has been archived on microfilm. The drawing was reproduced at the best quality possible. Letters and numbers in the circles indicate footing and column locations.
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  CO-83-Q-23 – View of the first floor plan. The first floor housed administrative offices, the central computing, utility systems, analytical laboratories, and maintenance shops. The original drawing has been archived on microfilm. The drawing was reproduced at the best quality possible. Letters and numbers in the circles indicate footing and column locations.
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  CO-83-Q-24 – View of the second floor plan. Enriched uranium and stainless steel weapons component production-related activities occurred primarily on the second floor. The original drawing has been archived on microfilm. The drawing was reproduced at the best quality possible. Letters and numbers in the circles indicate footing and column locations.
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  CO-83-Q-25 – View of the machine tool layout in Rooms 244 and 296. Machines were used for stainless steel fabrication (the J-line). The original drawing has been archived on microfilm. The drawing was reproduced at the best quality possible. Letters and numbers in the circles indicate footing and column locations.